Thursday, 13 November 2014

How do we Digitise?

Today was the second instalment of The National Archive's digitisation workshop, which focused on the 'How' as opposed to the 'Why'.  This is obviously a massive topic and TNA chose not to focus on file formats and other such technical information, which could form a whole study day in itself but rather on the strategy and planning required around licensing and joining with commercial partners and the advantages and pitfalls of such paths of digitisation.
The National Archive swans
It is encouraging to find out that TNA are also grappling with cloud storage, in-house vs. commercial digitisation and other such issues, which are flummoxing many others in the profession.  The roles of archivists are expanding out of collection management into marketing, IT, outreach etc. and we need to move with the times.  Not only are researchers now expecting material to be digitised and searchable but archivists are now expected to be masters of many arts and, indeed, sciences.

One of the most interesting parts of today was the trip to the conservation lab and digitisation suite at TNA.  There is a dedicated team of paper conservators who work on all material before it is digitised, either in-house or for commercial purposes, to ensure that text can be as legible as possible and the material is stable.  Material is then sent to the internal digitisation suite or the area set aside for external commercial companies to come in and scan on site.  If only we all had these facilities!!

Nearest tube station...with a very shiny sign
There was much discussion around commercial partnerships and the questions you must ask yourselves and your institution before embarking on such a relationship.  It has been really helpful to have a think about issues that need to be ironed out before you sign a contract and also to know that TNA are there for dispensing advice if you feel alone!  Many archives do not have the luxury of a legal department as we do and so having the back-up of TNA is invaluable.

A lot of time was spent discussing cloud storage, which is something that the NT is currently taking a look at.  I am now more knowledgeable about general and specialist cloud storage suppliers and the merits and downfalls of each.  As a result, I'll be more capable of having an informed discussion with IT when the time comes to consider where all of our data is stored and backed up.

A worrying amount of time was spent explaining that
data is not stored in actual clouds...
The Head of Digitisation Services for TNA helpfully pointed out to those struggling with the concept of cloud storage that all we are doing is outsourcing storage to a data centre.  It needn't be a big scary unknown quantity, we're just asking someone else to store our data and we need to put certain rules and guidelines in place to ensure its safe keeping.  If you want to take a look at the TNA's guidance on cloud storage and digital preservation, click here.

We covered far too much to include here but TNA have said that they would like to make these digitisation workshops a regular thing and I would encourage anyone undertaking digitisation projects or thinking about planning one or applying for funding to tag along.  They are great networking opportunities too and it is always encouraging to realise that you are not missing out on a cover-all solution - we are all grappling with the same issues and, in a spirit of communication and good will, we will get there!

Wednesday, 12 November 2014

Why Digitise?

Last week I and a colleague attended the first of a two day event on digitisation at The National Archives.  Last week, we focused on the ‘Why?’ of digitisation, which, as can be imagined, looked at income generation, audience participation and commercialisation.  This is a very pertinent question for the National Theatre as we embark on our Lyttelton Lounge, main site access to the archive via a digital interface, and come to the end of a major project to digitise all technical, rehearsal and production photographs from our founding in 1963 to present day.

As I am relatively new to my post, I was not present when the Lyttelton Lounge or the digitisation project were planned and so it was interesting to hear from TNA and the collection managers present what sorts of concerns they took into consideration when planning which collections to digitise, where to apply for funding and how to disseminate their new found assets.


The National Archives

An interesting point was made about the danger of falling into the trap of planning your digital projects based on the successes of your physical material projects.  Existing business models may well not work on digital projects, which can have very different audiences to material in the reading room.  We need to embrace digital as an entity in itself and not be scared of our new assets but capitalise on them.

Our workshop discussion helpfully focused on people and to what extent you need to know who your primary audience is before you start your planning.  This is now a main focus of the Lyttelton Lounge discussions, two months short of its opening, and it is integral to know who you are catering for when you plan digital projects or collections, in our case, and the interface for your content.  I suppose the level of required knowledge of audience depends, to an extent, on whether you are curating your digital content or throwing it all out there on a website such as Flickr or some digital asset management system front end for researchers to engage with as they wish.  


Tablets and phones by tribehut, on Flickr

Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License   by  tribehut 


As we are curating collections, I think it is more prudent that we aim at those audiences that we thing will be engaging with a 'digital lounge'.  The issue with a theatre that is open all day to anyone who wants a warm seat and free wifi is that the audience is incredibly wide and their interests are nigh on impossible to measure, even with our audience experience team.  Hence, we are planning on trying out several different user experiences in the first year or so and see how they are received.

TNA presented several research papers on the use of the internet and the work done by archives, namely local authorities, to have a discernible web presence.  The ‘Top 6’ website tips are to have:

  • a web presence
  • a searchable online catalogue
  • a means by which to see/buy digitised images
  • news or a blog
  • social media presence
  • links to resources of interest to researchers

Thankfully, the NT’s archive website ticks or almost ticks all of the boxes that it can.  We have centralised NT Facebook and Twitter accounts and there is also a blog, which the archive will be contributing to as of the next few months.  

The National Theatre Archive website: www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/discover-more/archive

I am looking forward to this week's workshop when we discuss the ‘How?’ along with commercial licensing and, hopefully, some chat on the dreaded copyright!