Wednesday, 12 November 2014

Why Digitise?

Last week I and a colleague attended the first of a two day event on digitisation at The National Archives.  Last week, we focused on the ‘Why?’ of digitisation, which, as can be imagined, looked at income generation, audience participation and commercialisation.  This is a very pertinent question for the National Theatre as we embark on our Lyttelton Lounge, main site access to the archive via a digital interface, and come to the end of a major project to digitise all technical, rehearsal and production photographs from our founding in 1963 to present day.

As I am relatively new to my post, I was not present when the Lyttelton Lounge or the digitisation project were planned and so it was interesting to hear from TNA and the collection managers present what sorts of concerns they took into consideration when planning which collections to digitise, where to apply for funding and how to disseminate their new found assets.


The National Archives

An interesting point was made about the danger of falling into the trap of planning your digital projects based on the successes of your physical material projects.  Existing business models may well not work on digital projects, which can have very different audiences to material in the reading room.  We need to embrace digital as an entity in itself and not be scared of our new assets but capitalise on them.

Our workshop discussion helpfully focused on people and to what extent you need to know who your primary audience is before you start your planning.  This is now a main focus of the Lyttelton Lounge discussions, two months short of its opening, and it is integral to know who you are catering for when you plan digital projects or collections, in our case, and the interface for your content.  I suppose the level of required knowledge of audience depends, to an extent, on whether you are curating your digital content or throwing it all out there on a website such as Flickr or some digital asset management system front end for researchers to engage with as they wish.  


Tablets and phones by tribehut, on Flickr

Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License   by  tribehut 


As we are curating collections, I think it is more prudent that we aim at those audiences that we thing will be engaging with a 'digital lounge'.  The issue with a theatre that is open all day to anyone who wants a warm seat and free wifi is that the audience is incredibly wide and their interests are nigh on impossible to measure, even with our audience experience team.  Hence, we are planning on trying out several different user experiences in the first year or so and see how they are received.

TNA presented several research papers on the use of the internet and the work done by archives, namely local authorities, to have a discernible web presence.  The ‘Top 6’ website tips are to have:

  • a web presence
  • a searchable online catalogue
  • a means by which to see/buy digitised images
  • news or a blog
  • social media presence
  • links to resources of interest to researchers

Thankfully, the NT’s archive website ticks or almost ticks all of the boxes that it can.  We have centralised NT Facebook and Twitter accounts and there is also a blog, which the archive will be contributing to as of the next few months.  

The National Theatre Archive website: www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/discover-more/archive

I am looking forward to this week's workshop when we discuss the ‘How?’ along with commercial licensing and, hopefully, some chat on the dreaded copyright!

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